Archive for: Clark Judge

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Perspectives

What is the greatest force shaping our age?

On the front page of Saturday’s Wall Street Journal, two unrelated articles pointed to a greater story.

The first concerned a 15- or 16-year-old factory girl in Bangladesh. Her name was Mahinur Akhter. She survived five weeks of burial in the collapsed garment factory where she had worked. A seamstress, she had earned $90-100 a month, essential to her family. Her father died in a traffic accident last year. She now struggles with fear of returning to rickety industrial buildings versus the needs of her mother and siblings. But the tragedy of the factories is part of a greater story of hope.

“For millions” in Bangladesh, the article noted, “global demand for cheap garments provides a chance to lift their families from destitution.” It continued:

Read the entire piece here. 

Perspectives

Rioting in Ferguson – A Disheartening Rejection of the Civil Rights Movement

The most disheartening fact about the riots in Ferguson, Missouri, is that the rioters reject due process of law. Yet these same rioters are among the Americans who should be most invested in protecting the law’s protections. They are, after all, some of the chief beneficiaries of the nearly two-century struggle to achieve the very rights they now so violently want to wipe away.

Read the entire piece here.

Perspectives

The GOP Establishment, the Tea Party and 2016

Sunday’s New York Times ran this top of the fold, front-page headline (left column, meaning the number two story of the day), “Before Battling Democrats, GOP is Fighting Itself.”

To some extent The Times was trying to stoke the flames of Republican division. Even so, the Tea Party v. the Establishment is all the buzz in Washington just now.  Will the Republicans rip themselves apart before Mitch McConnell even takes up the reins of the Senate majority leader?  Inquiring minds want to know.

Read the entire piece here.

Perspectives

Visit to a Country of Ghosts

I spent September’s last full week in Budapest, capital of Hungary. Sharing a border with Ukraine, the former Warsaw Pact country is now member of the European Union and NATO. For the United States, it is a strategic country in what has become, thanks to Russian president Vladimir Putin, a tense region.

Over four days, I met with senior political figures and their advisors, college professors, entrepreneurs and journalists and posed questions to an astute British expatriate who was my guide. I also delivered lectures at three universities.

Read the entire piece here.

Perspectives

For the Mid-Terms, Does the GOP Have What it Takes?

By all rights, the GOP should be walking away with the mid-term elections, a shoo-in to capture the Senate and even make gains in the House, which they already hold by a comfortable margin.

After all, the job environment remains dismal.  According to the union-backed Economic Policy Institute, if you are a recent college grad, your chances of being unemployed or underemployed are 25 percent.  If you are a recent high school grad not going to college, those odds rise to 63 percent.

It is not much better for women and minorities.  The number of women and minorities employed in the United States is all but unchanged since the Democrats took over the government in 2009.  The incomes of both have dropped.

Read the entire piece here. 

Perspectives

Thomas Jefferson, the Constitution and Slavery

It was William Faulkner who wrote, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” How we understand the origins of our institutions and the men and women who shaped them shapes what we value about them now. It informs what we keep and what we change and what we build that’s new.

Last month, on 4th of July weekend, I found myself thinking about Thomas Jefferson and slavery. You know the derision directed at the author of the Declaration of Independence on this topic — and, in some quarters, at the legitimacy of the entire American project in light of his and the other Founders’ failure to abolish slavery at the country’s start.

I have a different view.

Read the entire piece here.

Perspectives

Income Inequality in America: Is It Rising and Is It Bad

For anyone following the media just now, it is hard to get through a week without hearing about income inequality in America. In case you missed it, it’s gone up in the last few decades and this, we are told, is a bad thing. On both accounts, I wonder.

The recent flurry of interest follows the publication of Capital in the 21st Century, by French economist Thomas Piketty. After laying out his data, Piketty calls for a cure of, yes, higher taxes and a variety of familiar left-wing policy elixirs. Paul Krugman loves him.

Maybe Mr. Krugman shouldn’t have chortled so quickly.

Read the entire piece here. 

Perspectives

Matt Ridley takes on the Global Warming World

The average global temperature has not risen for 15 years.  Extreme weather events are at or below historical norms.  In the Southern Hemisphere sea ice has hit record highs (http://bit.ly/1vlDqP6).  So of course the Obama Administration has once more declared that the debate is over and that global warming is a fact, and the Supreme Court last week gave the green light to the White House’s anti-climate change campaign.

Matt Ridley would not be surprised.

Read the entire piece here.

Perspectives

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Rising Tides’

Is any American literary genre more despised than works by sitting members of Congress? Windy, vacuous, banal: with few exceptions, they are embarrassments to the republic.

Not so on the far side of the pond. Edmund Burke, Winston Churchill, Roy Jenkins, Matthew Ridley: the houses of Parliament have long been among the United Kingdom’s richest veins of political, economic and historical writings. “Rising Tides,” a new book by Liam Fox, member of Parliament, is a case in point.

Read the entire thing here. 

Perspectives

What is John Roberts Up To?

It looks to me as though Chief Justice Roberts has been — and continues to be — concerned that 5-4 decision after 5-4 decision is undermining the Court’s standing with significant segments of the public. Thus in the ObamaCare cases he secured a break in the liberal ranks on one issue and himself broke conservative ranks on another. In other hot-button areas where he believes a 5-4 decision is inevitable, he pushes the Court to pass on the case.

Read the entire piece here.